Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Experimental sleep disruption and reward learning: moderating role of positive affect responses.

Authors
  • Finan, Patrick H1
  • Whitton, Alexis E2
  • Letzen, Janelle E1
  • Remeniuk, Bethany1
  • Robinson, Mercedes L1
  • Irwin, Michael R3
  • Pizzagalli, Diego A2
  • Smith, Michael T1
  • 1 Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD.
  • 2 Department of Psychiatry, McLean Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Belmont, MA.
  • 3 UCLA Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, Los Angeles, CA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
SLEEP
Publisher
Oxford University Press
Publication Date
May 01, 2019
Volume
42
Issue
5
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1093/sleep/zsz026
PMID: 30927744
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Sleep disturbances increase vulnerability for depression, but the mechanisms underlying this relationship are not well known. We investigated the effects of experimental sleep disruption on response bias (RB), a measure of reward learning previously linked to depression, and the moderating role of positive affect responses. Participants (N = 42) were healthy adults enrolled in a within-subject crossover sleep disruption experiment that incorporated one night of uninterrupted sleep (US) and one night of forced awakenings (FA) in random order. On the day following each experimental sleep night, participants completed a probabilistic reward task to assess RB, and the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule-X. Participants were subgrouped according to positive affect responses: Preserved Positive Affect (i.e. positive affect scores maintained or increased; n = 15) or Reduced Positive Affect (i.e. positive affect scores decreased; n = 27) following FA. Contrary to our hypotheses, across participants, RB did not significantly differ between the US and FA sleep conditions (p = .67). However, the effect of sleep condition on RB was moderated by positive affect response (p = .01); those with preserved positive affect showed heightened RB following FA, whereas those with reduced positive affect showed diminished RB following FA. Changes in negative affect between US and FA did not moderate RB. The inability to preserve positive affect through periods of sleep disruption may be a marker of diminished reward learning capability. Understanding how sleep disruption impacts positive affect responses and reward learning identifies a pathway by which sleep disturbances may confer risk for depression. © Sleep Research Society 2019. Published by Oxford University Press [on behalf of the Sleep Research Society]. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: [email protected]

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times