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Experience with juvenile polyps in North American children: the need for pancolonoscopy.

Authors
  • Gupta, S K
  • Fitzgerald, J F
  • Croffie, J M
  • Chong, S K
  • Pfefferkorn, M C
  • Davis, M M
  • Faught, P R
Type
Published Article
Journal
The American journal of gastroenterology
Publication Date
Jun 01, 2001
Volume
96
Issue
6
Pages
1695–1697
Identifiers
PMID: 11419816
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

We report a recent experience with juvenile polyps (JP) in a large cohort of North American children to determine if a pancolonoscopy (PC) is needed in all children with suspected polyps. We reviewed hospital charts of all patients with JP seen over a 9-yr period (January, 1990-October, 1998). A total of 331 JP were encountered during 195 procedures in 184 patients (64% males, 88% white, mean age 5.93 yr [range 0.42-15.5 yr], median age 4.84 yr). Painless rectal bleeding was the commonest symptom. PC was performed in 42% (82/195) of procedures, and 177 JP were encountered: 54% (97/177) were in the rectosigmoid colon, 14% (24/177) were in the descending colon, and 32% (56/177) were proximal to the splenic flexure (i.e., proximal polyps). Overall, proximal polyps were seen in 37% (31/82) of PC. Only proximal polyps were noted in 12% (10/82) of PC. Five patients were re-endoscoped after an initial limited examination because of continuing symptoms from proximal polyps. All but one of the polyps had typical features of a JP on histological examination. Though most JP are located in the left colon, a PC should be the initial procedure because: 1) 37% of PC revealed proximal polyps, 2) 32% of polyps were located proximal to splenic flexure, 3) persistence of symptoms from missed proximal polyp(s) necessitates a repeat study with attendant risks, and 4) there is a possibility of malignant transformation in an unidentified JP.

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