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Experience with antiretroviral electronic adherence monitoring among young African American men who have sex with men living with HIV: findings to inform a triaged real-time alert intervention.

Authors
  • Dworkin, Mark S1
  • Panchal, Palak1
  • Wiebel, Wayne1
  • Garofalo, Robert2
  • Jimenez, Antonio3
  • Haberer, Jessica E4
  • 1 Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Illinois at Chicago School of Public Health, Chicago, IL, USA.
  • 2 Department of Pediatrics, Northwestern University/Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA.
  • 3 Community Outreach Intervention Projects, University of Illinois at Chicago School of Public Health, Chicago, IL, USA.
  • 4 Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Global Health, Boston, MA, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
AIDS care
Publication Date
Sep 01, 2020
Volume
32
Issue
9
Pages
1092–1101
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1080/09540121.2020.1713975
PMID: 31941360
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

We performed a pilot study among young African-American men who have sex with men (AAMSM) of real-time electronic adherence monitoring (EAM) in Chicago to explore acceptability and feasibility of EAM and to inform intervention development. We recruited 40 young AAMSM living with HIV on ART to participate in up to 3 months of monitoring with the Wisepill device. Participants were interviewed at baseline, in response to the first true adjudicated 1-dose, 3-day, and 7-day misses, and at the end of monitoring. Reasons for missing doses and the acceptability and feasibility of electronic monitoring were assessed using mixed methods. The median participant observation time was 90 days (N = 40). For 21 participants with 90 days of follow-up, <90% and <80% adherence occurred in 82% and 79%, respectively in at least one of their monitored months (n = 63 monitored months). The participants generally found the proposed intervention acceptable and useful. Although seven participants said the device attracted attention, none said it led to disclosure of their HIV status. This study found real-time EAM to be generally acceptable and feasible among YAAMSM living with HIV in Chicago. Future work will develop a triaged real-time EAM intervention including text alerts following detection of nonadherence.

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