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An Examination of Myers-Briggs Type Indicator Personality, Gender, and Career Interests of Ontario Veterinary College Students.

Authors
  • Goetz, Monika L1
  • Jones-Bitton, Andria1
  • Hewson, Joanne1
  • Khosa, Deep1
  • Pearl, David1
  • Bakker, Dorothy J2
  • Lyons, Sean T3
  • Conlon, Peter D1
  • 1 Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph.
  • 2 Department of Family Medicine.
  • 3 Leadership and Management Gordon S Lang School.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of veterinary medical education
Publication Date
Jul 01, 2020
Volume
47
Issue
4
Pages
430–444
Identifiers
DOI: 10.3138/jvme.0418-044r
PMID: 31738683
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

The objectives of this study were to describe the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) distribution of Ontario Veterinary College (OVC) veterinary students (n = 1,249), and to evaluate its associations with gender and career interests. This was achieved by collecting pre-matriculation data from 11 graduating classes. Overall, OVC veterinary students were diverse in their MBTI types and preferences, as well as career interests. Extraversion, Sensing, Thinking, and Judging were the most prevalent preferences. Female veterinary students were 2.96 (95% CI = 2.11-4.17) times more likely to demonstrate the Feeling preference and 1.89 (95% CI = 1.41-2.56) more likely to prefer Judging, compared to male students (who were more likely to prefer the Thinking and Perceiving preferences, respectively). At entry to the veterinary program, students who preferred Intuition (vs. Sensing) were 2.08 (95% CI = 1.33-3.33) times more likely to be interested in a veterinary career other than practice, and 1.92 (95% CI = 1.43-2.56) times more likely to be undecided about their future veterinary career path. Both at entry to the program and in their final-year stream choice, students of the Thinking preference were more likely to select equine or food animal, rather than small animal practice, compared to students of the Feeling preference. There were additional significant associations regarding MBTI preferences and career interests. This study highlights the diversity of veterinary students, and provides an opportunity for educators to potentially expand their teaching methods and career guidance resources to better reach students of all MBTI preferences.

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