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Parental Style, Dating Violence and Gender.

Authors
  • Muñiz-Rivas, María1
  • Vera, María2
  • Povedano-Díaz, Amapola3
  • 1 Department of Social Anthropology, Seville University, 41013 Seville, Spain. , (Spain)
  • 2 Department of Education and Social Psychology, Pablo de Olavide University, 41013 Seville, Spain. , (Spain)
  • 3 Department of Education and Social Psychology, Pablo de Olavide University, 41013 Seville, Spain. [email protected] , (Spain)
Type
Published Article
Journal
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Publisher
MDPI AG
Publication Date
Jul 30, 2019
Volume
16
Issue
15
Identifiers
DOI: 10.3390/ijerph16152722
PMID: 31366170
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

The relationship between parenting styles and teen dating violence has become a relevant research topic in recent years, especially related to violence inflicted online. To more fully understand this relationship, the objective of the present study was to examine which parenting style (authoritarian, indulgent, authoritative, or neglectful) best protects against dating violence in adolescent relationships. A total of 1132 adolescents of both sexes participated in this study (46.4% boys and 53.6% girls), with ages between 14 and 18 years old (M = 15.6, SD = 1.3). A multivariate factorial design was applied (MANOVA, 4 × 2), using the parenting style, the parents' gender, and the adolescents' gender as independent variables, and the dating violence dimensions (online and offline) as dependent variables. As the results show, the lowest scores on all the dating violence dimensions examined were obtained by adolescents from indulgent families. In addition, three interaction effects were observed between the mother's parenting style and the adolescent's gender on online violence (e-violence and control), and the father's parenting style on offline violence (verbal-emotional). Thus, adolescents with authoritarian mothers obtained the highest scores on violence and control inflicted online, respectively, and adolescent girls with authoritarian fathers obtained the highest scores on verbal-emotional violence. These findings suggest that the indulgent style is the parenting style that protects against violence in teen dating relationships, and they also highlight the risks of the authoritarian style as a family child-rearing model.

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