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Ex Vivo Organ Cultures as Models to Study Bone Biology

Authors
  • Bellido, Teresita1, 1, 1, 2
  • Delgado‐Calle, Jesus1, 1, 2, 1
  • 1 Indiana University School of Medicine, USA , (United States)
  • 2 Richard L. Roudebush Veterans Affairs Medical Center, USA , (United States)
Type
Published Article
Journal
JBMR Plus
Publisher
John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
Publication Date
Feb 14, 2020
Volume
4
Issue
3
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1002/jbm4.10345
PMID: 32161838
PMCID: PMC7059827
Source
PubMed Central
Keywords
License
Unknown
External links

Abstract

The integrity of the skeleton is maintained by the coordinated and balanced activities of the bone cells. Osteoclasts resorb bone, osteoblasts form bone, and osteocytes orchestrate the activities of osteoclasts and osteoblasts. A variety of in vitro approaches has been used in an attempt to reproduce the complex in vivo interactions among bone cells under physiological as well as pathological conditions and to test new therapies. Most cell culture systems lack the proper extracellular matrix, cellular diversity, and native spatial distribution of the components of the bone microenvironment. In contrast, ex vivo cultures of fragments of intact bone preserve key cell–cell and cell–matrix interactions and allow the study of bone cells in their natural 3D environment. Further, bone organ cultures predict the in vivo responses to genetic and pharmacologic interventions saving precious time and resources. Moreover, organ cultures using human bone reproduce human conditions and are a useful tool to test patient responses to therapeutic agents. Thus, these ex vivo approaches provide a platform to perform research in bone physiology and pathophysiology. In this review, we describe protocols optimized in our laboratories to establish ex vivo bone organ cultures and provide technical hints and suggestions. In addition, we present examples on how this technical approach can be employed to study osteocyte biology, drug responses in bone, cancer‐induced bone disease, and cross‐talk between bone and other organs © 2020 The Authors. JBMR Plus published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

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