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The evolving nature of Bordetella pertussis in Ontario, Canada, 2009-2017: strains with shifting genotypes and pertactin deficiency.

Authors
  • Tsang, Raymond S W1
  • Shuel, Michelle1
  • Cronin, Kirby1, 2
  • Deng, Saul1
  • Whyte, Kathleen1
  • Marchand-Austin, Alex2
  • Ma, Jennifer2
  • Bolotin, Shelly2, 3
  • Crowcroft, Natasha2, 3
  • Schwartz, Kevin2
  • Van Domselaar, Gary1
  • Graham, Morag1
  • Jamieson, Frances B2, 3
  • 1 Public Health Agency of Canada, National Microbiology Laboratory, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. , (Canada)
  • 2 Public Health Ontario Laboratory, Public Health Ontario, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. , (Canada)
  • 3 University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. , (Canada)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Canadian Journal of Microbiology
Publisher
Canadian Science Publishing
Publication Date
Nov 01, 2019
Volume
65
Issue
11
Pages
823–830
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1139/cjm-2019-0128
PMID: 31295416
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

This study examined the evolving nature of Bordetella pertussis in Ontario, Canada, by characterizing isolates for their genotypes and expression of pertactin (PRN). From 2009 to 2017, 413 B. pertussis were cultured from pertussis cases at the Public Health Ontario Laboratory. Their genotypes were determined by partial gene sequence analysis of their virulence and (or) vaccine antigens: filamentous haemagglutinin, PRN, fimbriae 3, and pertussis toxin, including the promoter region. Expression of PRN was measured by Western immunoblot. Two predominant genotypes, ST-1 and ST-2, were found throughout the study and were responsible for 47.5% and 46.3% of all case isolates, respectively. The prevalence of ST-1 appeared to fluctuate from 80.3% in 2009 to 20.0% in 2014 and 58.5% in 2017, while the prevalence of ST-2 changed from 18.4% in 2009 to 80.0% in 2014 and 26.2% in 2017. A PRN-deficient strain was first noted in 2011 (16.7%), and its prevalence increased to 70.8% in 2016 but decreased to 46.2% in 2017. More ST-2 (46.6%) than ST-1 (16.8%) strains were associated with PRN deficiency. Newer ST-21 and ST-22 found in 2015-2017 were uniformly PRN deficient. The impact of the evolving nature of B. pertussis on disease epidemiology requires further longitudinal studies.

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