Affordable Access

deepdyve-link deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Evolutionary genetics and vector adaptation of recombinant viruses of the western equine encephalitis antigenic complex provides new insights into alphavirus diversity and host switching.

Authors
  • Allison, Andrew B1
  • Stallknecht, David E2
  • Holmes, Edward C3
  • 1 Baker Institute for Animal Health, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA; Southeastern Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Georgia)
  • 2 Southeastern Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA; Department of Population Health, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA. , (Georgia)
  • 3 Marie Bashir Institute for Infectious Diseases and Biosecurity, Charles Perkins Centre, School of Biological Sciences and Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia. , (Australia)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Virology
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2015
Volume
474
Pages
154–162
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.virol.2014.10.024
PMID: 25463613
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

Western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV), Highlands J virus (HJV), and Fort Morgan virus (FMV) are the sole representatives of the WEE antigenic complex of the genus Alphavirus, family Togaviridae, that are endemic to North America. All three viruses have their ancestry in a recombination event involving eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) and a Sindbis (SIN)-like virus that gave rise to a chimeric alphavirus that subsequently diversified into the present-day WEEV, HJV, and FMV. Here, we present a comparative analysis of the genetic, ecological, and evolutionary relationships among these recombinant-origin viruses, including the description of a nsP4 polymerase mutation in FMV that allows it to circumvent the host range barrier to Asian tiger mosquito cells, a vector species that is normally refractory to infection. Notably, we also provide evidence that the recombination event that gave rise to these three WEEV antigenic complex viruses may have occurred in North America.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times