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No evidence of oxidant stress during high-intensity rowing training.

Authors
  • Dernbach, A R
  • Sherman, W M
  • Simonsen, J C
  • Flowers, K M
  • Lamb, D R
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of applied physiology (Bethesda, Md. : 1985)
Publication Date
May 01, 1993
Volume
74
Issue
5
Pages
2140–2145
Identifiers
PMID: 8335541
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

In untrained subjects, strenuous exercise provokes the appearance of oxidant stress markers in blood and muscle. On the other hand, trained muscle is resistant to oxidant stress unless exercise challenges the muscle glycogen supply. It is not known whether chronic high-intensity exercise alters the susceptibility of skeletal muscle to oxidant stress, whether there are gender-related differences in markers of oxidant stress, or whether elevating muscle glycogen stores by increasing dietary carbohydrate can minimize any exercise-related oxidant stress. To address these issues, collegiate rowers (12 men, 11 women) were randomly assigned to a moderate-(MOD, 5 g/kg body wt) or high-carbohydrate (HI, 10 g/kg) diet in a double-blind design and underwent strenuous training for 4 wk. Training in the A.M. was 40 min at 70% maximal O2 consumption (VO2); in the P.M. it was either three 2,500-m time trials (to assess power output) or aerobic and lactate tolerance training. Total daily training time was 65 min at 70% maximal VO2 and 38 min at > or = 90% maximal VO2. Thrice-weekly morning blood samples were assayed for serum creatine kinase (CK), plasma thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), and serum beta-glucuronidase (beta-Gluc). Weekly muscle biopsies were obtained for analysis of glycogen and, when tissue sample quantity allowed, TBARS. HI rowers produced more power and improved power more (10.7 +/- 1.0 vs. 1.6 +/- 1.6%) over the 4 wk than did the MOD rowers. Preexercise muscle glycogen concentration was maintained at 119 mmol/kg in MOD but increased 65% in HI rowers (P < 0.05).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

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