Affordable Access

Events during the first four rounds of mitosis establish three developmental domains in the syncytial endosperm of Arabidopsis thaliana.

Authors
  • Brown, R C
  • Lemmon, B E
  • Nguyen, H
Type
Published Article
Journal
Protoplasma
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2003
Volume
222
Issue
3-4
Pages
167–174
Identifiers
PMID: 14714205
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Endosperm begins development as a single fertilized cell that undergoes many rounds of mitosis without cytokinesis resulting in a syncytium. The multinucleate cytoplasm is organized by nucleus-based radial microtubule systems into nuclear-cytoplasmic domains. When microtubules are organized into mitotic spindles, the integrity of the common cytoplasm is maintained by an unaltered network of filamentous actin. The first four rounds of mitosis result in the establishment of three developmental domains within the common cytoplasm. The spindles of the first two rounds of mitosis are oriented parallel to the long axis of the central cell, resulting in four nuclear-cytoplasmic domains in a filamentous arrangement. A switch in spindle orientation occurs in the third round of mitosis; all four spindles are oriented perpendicular to the long axis resulting in eight nuclear-cytoplasmic domains arranged in two adjacent files. Whereas the first three rounds of mitosis are synchronous, the fourth occurs as a wave of successive mitoses that begins at the micropylar pole. By the 16-nuclei stage, differences in nuclear shape, cytoskeletal arrays, and cytoplasmic characteristics mark the differentiation of the syncytium into micropylar, central, and chalazal developmental chambers. Nuclei in the micropylar chamber are fusiform and sheathed by parallel microtubules that flare from their tips, while those in the central and chalazal chambers are spherical. Nuclei in the central chamber are surrounded by radial microtubule systems, while those in the chalaza are enmeshed in a reticulum of microtubules. Whereas the cytoplasm in both micropylar and chalazal chambers is dense and nearly nonvacuolate, the syncytium in the central chamber consists of a single layer of evenly spaced nuclear-cytoplasmic domains surrounding a large central vacuole.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times