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Evaluation of Sleep Disorders in Patients With Severe Traumatic Brain Injury During Rehabilitation.

Authors
  • Gardani, Maria1
  • Morfiri, Eleni2
  • Thomson, Allan3
  • O'Neill, Brian4
  • McMillan, Thomas M5
  • 1 Institute of Health and Wellbeing, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, United Kingdom. Electronic address: [email protected] , (United Kingdom)
  • 2 National Health Service Greater Glasgow and Clyde, Glasgow, United Kingdom. , (United Kingdom)
  • 3 National Health Service Fife, Fife, United Kingdom. , (United Kingdom)
  • 4 Brain Injury Rehabilitation Trust, Glasgow, United Kingdom; Department of Psychology, University of Stirling, Stirling, United Kingdom. , (United Kingdom)
  • 5 Institute of Health and Wellbeing, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, United Kingdom. , (United Kingdom)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Archives of physical medicine and rehabilitation
Publication Date
Sep 01, 2015
Volume
96
Issue
9
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.apmr.2015.05.006
PMID: 26003285
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

To explore the presence and types of sleep disorders in chronic patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) undergoing inpatient rehabilitation using formal diagnostic criteria based on the International Classification of Sleep Disorders, 2nd edition. Cross-sectional study. Inpatient brain injury rehabilitation units. Chronic inpatients with severe TBI (N=30) were evaluated during rehabilitation. Not applicable. Participants wore an actiwatch for 7 days and completed self-report measures on sleep, mood, fatigue, pain, and daytime sleepiness. Twenty participants (67%) had a sleep-wake cycle disturbance, of which 15 (50%) met diagnostic criteria for a sleep disorder. Diagnosed sleep disorders in the sample were insomnia (26.7%), posttraumatic hypersomnia (6.7%), delayed sleep phase syndrome (10%), irregular sleep-wake pattern disorder (3.3%), and periodic limb movement disorder (3.3%). Sleep quality was estimated by senior clinical staff as interfering with rehabilitation in 36.6% of the sample. Poor sleep quality was associated with greater anxiety, fatigue, and daytime sleepiness. Consistent with previous studies, the present study showed high levels of sleep-wake cycle disturbances in patients with severe TBI undergoing rehabilitation, which were associated with anxiety, fatigue, and daytime sleepiness. These findings highlight the importance of assessing and treating sleep problems in patients with TBI undergoing rehabilitation. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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