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Evaluation of Religious Coping in Tunisian Muslim Women with Newly Diagnosed Breast Cancer.

Authors
  • Fekih-Romdhane, Feten1, 2
  • Hakiri, Abir3, 4
  • Fendri, Sana3
  • Balti, Mehdi3
  • Labbane, Raja3, 4
  • Cheour, Majda3, 4
  • 1 Faculty of Medicine of Tunis, Tunis, Tunisia. [email protected] , (Tunisia)
  • 2 Razi Hospital, 1 rue des orangers, Manouba, Tunisia. [email protected] , (Tunisia)
  • 3 Faculty of Medicine of Tunis, Tunis, Tunisia. , (Tunisia)
  • 4 Razi Hospital, 1 rue des orangers, Manouba, Tunisia. , (Tunisia)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Religion and Health
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Jun 01, 2021
Volume
60
Issue
3
Pages
1839–1855
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s10943-020-01066-9
PMID: 32691188
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Studies evaluating religious coping in Arab-Muslim populations are few. We aimed to evaluate religiosity and religious coping in a sample of breast cancer women, and to analyze the association between religiosity, religious coping, depression, anxiety, cancer clinical data, and sociodemographic data in our patients. A cross-sectional and descriptive study was conducted over a 4-month period in 61 newly diagnosed breast cancer women. We used the following scales: The Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (DASS-21), the Arabic-Brief Religious Coping Scale (A-BRCS) and the Arabic Religiosity Scale. The majority of participants (98.4%) had a moderate to high level of religiosity. A weak correlation was found between religious coping scores and stress, depression, and anxiety scores. Our patients had high scores of positive religious coping, with a mean score of 26.13 out of 28 and used more positive coping than negative coping to cope with the cancerous disease. High levels of affective religiosity were the main predictive factor of positive religious coping. Therapies should reinforce the positive religious coping patterns of breast cancer patients, and detect a possible resort to negative religious coping that may negatively affect the patients' quality of life.

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