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Evaluation of novel radiation protection devices during radiologically guided interventions.

Authors
  • Larsson, Maria E V1, 2
  • Jonasson, Pernilla I3
  • Apell, Petra S4, 5
  • Kearney, Peter P6
  • Lundh, Charlotta J3, 7
  • 1 Department of Medical Radiation Sciences, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. [email protected]. , (Sweden)
  • 2 Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. [email protected]. , (Sweden)
  • 3 Department of Medical Radiation Sciences, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. , (Sweden)
  • 4 Texray AB, Gothenburg, Sweden. , (Sweden)
  • 5 Department of Technology Management and Economics, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden. , (Sweden)
  • 6 Department of Cardiology, Cork University Hospital, Cork, Ireland. , (Ireland)
  • 7 Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. , (Sweden)
Type
Published Article
Journal
CVIR endovascular
Publication Date
Feb 14, 2024
Volume
7
Issue
1
Pages
18–18
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1186/s42155-024-00430-0
PMID: 38353904
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

In radiologically guided interventions, medical practitioners are subjected to radiation exposure, which may lead to radiation-induced diseases. In this study, novel radiation shields for the head and neck were evaluated for their potential to reduce radiation exposure. An anthropomorphic phantom was exposed on its left side to scattered radiation from beneath to simulate the exposure of an operator in a x-ray operating room. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were positioned at different depths in five slices in the phantom, measuring personal dose equivalent. Two different set up situations were evaluated: a head protector designed to reduce radiation in the upper section of the head; and a novel thyroid protector prototype extended in the front and on both sides, designed to reduce radiation in the lower and middle sections of the head. A standard thyroid collar prototype and a ceiling mounted lead glass shield were used as comparisons. Furthermore, the head protector was evaluated in a clinical study in which TLDs were positioned to measure scattered radiation exposure to the heads of operators during endovascular interventions. The extended thyroid protector reduced the scattered radiation in the throat, chin, and ear slices. Some shielding effect was seen in the brain and skull slices. The head protector showed a shielding effect in the skull slice up to two cm depth where it covered the phantom head. As expected, the ceiling mounted lead glass shield reduced the scattered radiation in all measuring points. A ceiling mounted lead glass shield is an effective radiation protection for the head, but in clinical practice, optimal positioning of a ceiling mounted lead shield may not always be possible, particularly during complex cases when radiation protection may be most relevant. Added protection using these novel guards may compliment the shielding effect of the ceiling mounted lead shield. The head protector stand-alone did not provide sufficient protection of the head. The extended thyroid protector stand-alone provided sufficient protection in the lower and middle sections of the head and neck. © 2024. The Author(s).

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