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Evaluation of Chilean Boldo Essential Oil as a Natural Insecticide Against Chrysomya megacephala (Diptera: Calliphoridae).

Authors
  • Viana, Thais de S1
  • Dias, Rayane F1
  • Vianna, Ana Carolina da S1
  • Moreira, Ricardo F A2
  • Aguiar, Valéria M1
  • 1 Departamento de Microbiologia e Parasitologia, Universidade Federal do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro CEP, Brasil.
  • 2 Departamento de Saúde Coletiva, Universidade Federal do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro CEP, Brasil.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Medical Entomology
Publisher
Oxford University Press
Publication Date
Sep 07, 2020
Volume
57
Issue
5
Pages
1364–1372
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1093/jme/tjaa051
PMID: 32198519
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Chrysomya megacephala (Fabricius, 1794) is a vector of enteric bacteria, protozoa, helminths, and viruses. These Diptera can also be responsible for secondary myiasis in several animal species. Therefore, it is easy to understand the relevance of studies focusing on C. megacephala dissemination control. The employment of essential oils as natural insecticides must be considered as a promising alternative for the replacement of synthetic insecticides. In this context, the essential oil obtained from Chilean boldo leaves should be highlighted. The aim of the present work was to assess the insecticidal activity of Chilean boldo essential oil against C. megacephala blowflies in different life stages (larva, pupa, and adult). The essential oils were extracted from commercial samples of Chilean boldo leaves by hydrodistillation and were mixed to produce a pool that was employed in the study. Gas chromatographic techniques were used to enable the identification and quantification of the pool's components. Larvae, pupae, and adult insects of C. megacephala were exposed (topical application) to different concentrations of this essential oil pool. After that, the larvicidal, pupicidal, and insecticidal actions of the oil were tested. Its toxicity might be associated with compounds such as eucalyptol, linalool, α-pinene, limonene, and ascaridole, either acting alone or by synergic effects. Interestingly, the pupae appeared to be stronger than the larvae and adult insects, needing higher doses of essential oil to be killed. The oil's toxic effects could be useful to control C. megacephala dissemination in all of its development phases. © The Author(s) 2020. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: [email protected]

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