Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Evaluating Regional Pulmonary Deposition using Patient-Specific 3D Printed Lung Models.

Authors
  • Peterman, Emma L1
  • Kolewe, Emily L1
  • Fromen, Catherine A2
  • 1 Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Delaware.
  • 2 Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Delaware; [email protected]
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Visualized Experiments
Publisher
MyJoVE Corporation
Publication Date
Nov 11, 2020
Issue
165
Identifiers
DOI: 10.3791/61706
PMID: 33252111
Source
Medline
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Development of targeted therapies for pulmonary diseases is limited by the availability of preclinical testing methods with the ability to predict regional aerosol delivery. Leveraging 3D printing to generate patient-specific lung models, we outline the design of a high-throughput, in vitro experimental setup for quantifying lobular pulmonary deposition. This system is made with a combination of commercially available and 3D printed components and allows the flow rate through each lobe of the lung to be independently controlled. Delivery of fluorescent aerosols to each lobe is measured using fluorescence microscopy. This protocol has the potential to promote the growth of personalized medicine for respiratory diseases through its ability to model a wide range of patient demographics and disease states. Both the geometry of the 3D printed lung model and the air flow profile setting can be easily modulated to reflect clinical data for patients with varying age, race, and gender. Clinically relevant drug delivery devices, such as the endotracheal tube shown here, can be incorporated into the testing setup to more accurately predict a device's capacity to target therapeutic delivery to a diseased region of the lung. The versatility of this experimental setup allows it to be customized to reflect a multitude of inhalation conditions, enhancing the rigor of preclinical therapeutic testing.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times