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Etiology of hypercalcemia in hemodialysis patients on calcium carbonate therapy.

Authors
  • Meric, F
  • Yap, P
  • Bia, M J
Type
Published Article
Journal
American journal of kidney diseases : the official journal of the National Kidney Foundation
Publication Date
Nov 01, 1990
Volume
16
Issue
5
Pages
459–464
Identifiers
PMID: 2239937
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Fourteen of 39 dialysis patients (36%) became hypercalcemic after switching to calcium carbonate as their principal phosphate binder. In order to identify risk factors associated with the development of hypercalcemia, indirect parameters of intestinal calcium reabsorption and bone turnover rate in these 14 patients were compared with results in 14 eucalcemic patients matched for age, sex, length of time on dialysis, and etiology of renal disease. In addition to experiencing hypercalcemic episodes with peak calcium values of 2.7 to 3.8 mmol/L (10.7 to 15.0 mg/dL), patients in the hypercalcemic group exhibited a significant increase in the mean calcium concentration obtained during 6 months before the switch, compared with the mean value obtained during the 7 months of observation after the switch (2.4 +/- 0.03 to 2.5 +/- 0.03 mmol/L [9.7 +/- 0.2 to 10.2 +/- 0.1 mg/dL], P = 0.006). In contrast, eucalcemic patients exhibited no change in mean calcium values over the same time period (2.3 +/- 0.05 to 2.3 +/- 0.05 mmol/L [9.2 +/- 0.2 to 9.2 +/- 0.2 mg/dL]). CaCO3 dosage, calculated dietary calcium intake, and circulating levels of vitamin D metabolites were similar in both groups. Physical activity index and predialysis serum bicarbonate levels also were similar in both groups. However, there was a significant difference in parameters reflecting bone turnover rates between groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

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