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Etiological factors in space motion sickness.

Authors
  • Lackner, J R
  • Graybiel, A
Type
Published Article
Journal
Aviation Space and Environmental Medicine
Publisher
Aerospace Medical Association
Publication Date
Aug 01, 1983
Volume
54
Issue
8
Pages
675–681
Identifiers
PMID: 6605145
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

We compared susceptibility to motion sickness during exposure to sudden-stop stimulation as a function of gravitoinertial force level. Our findings show that susceptibility is greatly enhanced, both with eyes-closed and eyes-open, for zero-g and 2-g conditions in parabolic flight compared with 1-g test conditions. The change in susceptibility is likely related to three factors: alterations in vestibulo-ocular function which result from variations in gravitoinertial force level (28,29); the altered pattern of otolithic activity resulting during variations in gravitoinertial force level; and the altered canal-otolith response synergies that result during exposure to gravitoinertial force levels greater or less than terrestrial levels. These factors are shown to be related to the etiology of space motion sickness and to the alterations in performance and vestibular function that are experienced by astronauts during reentry. An explanation is also proposed for the decrease in susceptibility to motion sickness exhibited by the Skylab astronauts inflight and for some period postflight during exposure to cross-coupled angular accelerations.

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