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Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid plus citrate-theophylline-adenosine-dipyridamole (EDTA-CTAD): a novel anticoagulant for the flow cytometric assessment of platelet and neutrophil activation ex vivo in whole blood.

Authors
  • Macey, Marion
  • McCarthy, Desmond
  • Azam, Urooj
  • Milne, Timothy
  • Golledge, Peter
  • Newland, Adrian
Type
Published Article
Journal
Cytometry. Part B, Clinical cytometry
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2003
Volume
51
Issue
1
Pages
30–40
Identifiers
PMID: 12500295
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) is the anticoagulant recommended for full blood counts, citrate is recommended for coagulation and platelet studies, and citrate-theophylline-adenosine-dipyridamole (CTAD) inhibits platelet activation. Because the combination of EDTA and CTAD (E/C) is better than EDTA or CTAD alone for measuring platelet parameters on the ADVIA 120 Haematology System, we investigated whether it also offers advantages for the flow cytometric assessment of platelet and/or neutrophil activation and platelet-leucocyte aggregate formation ex vivo. Blood from healthy subjects was collected into E/C or citrate, kept at room temperature or at 4 degrees C, and analysed 0 to 360 min later in the ADVIA 120 and by immunofluorescent flow cytometry. Platelet count, mean platelet volume, number of platelet clumps, mean platelet component, numbers of CD62P(+) platelets and platelet-leucocyte aggregates, and expression of CD11b on neutrophils changed little over 360 min in blood with E/C kept at 4 degrees C. In contrast, one or more parameter changed when blood was kept with E/C at ambient temperature or with citrate at either temperature. The use of E/C in in vitro and in vivo studies is illustrated. Platelet and neutrophil activation status ex vivo can be reliably assessed if blood is collected into E/C, held at 4 degrees C, and analysed within 6 h.

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