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Ethno-territorial rights and the resource extraction boom in Latin America : do constitutions matter?

Authors
  • Kröger, Markus
  • Lalander, Rickard
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2016
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1080/01436597.2015.1127154
OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-128385
Source
DiVA - Academic Archive On-line
Keywords
Language
English
License
Green
External links

Abstract

In recent times a growing number of Latin American rural groups have achieved extended ethno-territorial rights, and large territories have been protected by progressive constitutions. These were the outcomes of extended cycles of national and transnational contentious politics and of social movement struggle, including collective South–South cooperation. However, the continent has simultaneously experienced a resource extraction boom. Frequently the extractivism takes place in protected areas and/or Indigenous territories. Consequently economic interests collide with the protection and recognition of constitutional rights. Through a review of selected demonstrative cases across Latin America, this article analyses the (de jure) rights on paper versus the (de facto) rights in practice. / <p>Markus Kröger was funded by the Academy of Finland through two research projects: ‘The Politics of Corporate Resource Exploitation: Social Movement Influence on Paper and Metal Industry Investments in Brazil and India’; and ‘Human Ecology, Land Conversion and the Global Resource Economy’.</p>

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