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Ethnic-specific associations between body mass index and gastric cancer: a Mendelian randomization study in European and Korean populations.

Authors
  • Lee, Sangjun1, 2, 3
  • Park, Sue K4, 5, 6
  • 1 Department of Preventive Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea. , (North Korea)
  • 2 Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University, 103 Daehak-Ro, Jongno-Gu, Seoul, 03080, Republic of Korea. , (North Korea)
  • 3 Department of Biomedical Science, Seoul National University Graduate School, Seoul, Republic of Korea. , (North Korea)
  • 4 Department of Preventive Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea. [email protected]. , (North Korea)
  • 5 Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University, 103 Daehak-Ro, Jongno-Gu, Seoul, 03080, Republic of Korea. [email protected]. , (North Korea)
  • 6 Integrated Major in Innovative Medical Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea. [email protected]. , (North Korea)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Gastric cancer : official journal of the International Gastric Cancer Association and the Japanese Gastric Cancer Association
Publication Date
Nov 02, 2023
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s10120-023-01439-5
PMID: 37917198
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Given the uncertainties surrounding the associations in previous epidemiological studies, we conducted linear and nonlinear Mendelian randomization (MR) studies to evaluate whether body mass index (BMI) associated with gastric cancer (GC) risk in European and Korean. Genome-wide association study-summary statistics were used from the Pan-UK Biobank, the Genetic Investigation of Anthropometric Traits consortium, the K-CHIP consortium, and BioBank Japan. BMI-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were used as instrumental variables (IVs) in MR to identify the association between BMI and GC. Both linear and nonlinear MR analyses were performed. Sensitivity analyses were also conducted for individuals below or above a BMI of 24 kg/m2. The study used 22 and 55 SNPs as IVs for BMI in European and Korean populations, respectively. Genetically predicted BMI was positively associated with GC risk in the European population (Odds ratio per 1 kg/m2 increase; 95% CI = 1.17; 1.01-1.36 using simple median method), but no significant association was observed in the Korean population. However, the nonlinear MR identified a U-shaped association between BMI and GC in the Korean population, with both low and high BMIs associated with increased GC risk. A BMI of 24 kg/m2 presented the lowest risk. Sensitivity analyses did not yield any genome-wide significant SNPs. While MR analysis suggests a linear association between BMI and GC in those of European ancestry, nonlinear MR hints at a U-shaped association in Koreans. This suggests the association between BMI and GC risk may vary according to ethnic ancestry. © 2023. The Author(s) under exclusive licence to The International Gastric Cancer Association and The Japanese Gastric Cancer Association.

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