Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Establishing Objective Measures of Clinical Competence in Undergraduate Medical Education Through Immersive Virtual Reality.

Authors
  • Zackoff, Matthew W1
  • Young, Daniel2
  • Sahay, Rashmi D3
  • Fei, Lin4
  • Real, Francis J5
  • Guiot, Amy6
  • Lehmann, Corinne7
  • Klein, Melissa8
  • 1 Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine (MW Zackoff, L Fei, FJ Real, A Guiot, C Lehmann, M Klein), Cincinnati, Ohio; Division of Critical Care Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center (MW Zackoff), Cincinnati, Ohio. Electronic address: [email protected]
  • 2 Department of Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center (D Young), Cincinnati, Ohio.
  • 3 Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Department of Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center (RD Sahay, L Fei), Cincinnati, Ohio.
  • 4 Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine (MW Zackoff, L Fei, FJ Real, A Guiot, C Lehmann, M Klein), Cincinnati, Ohio; Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Department of Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center (RD Sahay, L Fei), Cincinnati, Ohio.
  • 5 Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine (MW Zackoff, L Fei, FJ Real, A Guiot, C Lehmann, M Klein), Cincinnati, Ohio; Division of General and Community Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center (FJ Real, M Klein), Cincinnati, Ohio.
  • 6 Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine (MW Zackoff, L Fei, FJ Real, A Guiot, C Lehmann, M Klein), Cincinnati, Ohio; Division of Hospital Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center (A Guiot, M Klein), Cincinnati, Ohio.
  • 7 Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine (MW Zackoff, L Fei, FJ Real, A Guiot, C Lehmann, M Klein), Cincinnati, Ohio; Division of Adolescent Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center (C Lehmann), Cincinnati, Ohio.
  • 8 Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine (MW Zackoff, L Fei, FJ Real, A Guiot, C Lehmann, M Klein), Cincinnati, Ohio; Division of General and Community Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center (FJ Real, M Klein), Cincinnati, Ohio; Division of Hospital Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center (A Guiot, M Klein), Cincinnati, Ohio.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Academic pediatrics
Publication Date
Apr 01, 2021
Volume
21
Issue
3
Pages
575–579
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.acap.2020.10.010
PMID: 33091608
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

The Association of American Medical Colleges defines recognition of the need for urgent or emergent escalation of care as a key Entrustable Professional Activity (EPA) for entering residency (EPA#10). This study pilots the use of an immersive virtual reality (VR) platform for defining objective observable behaviors as standards for evaluation of medical student recognition of impending respiratory failure. A cross-sectional observational study was conducted from July 2018 to December 2019, evaluating student performance during a VR scenario of an infant in impending respiratory failure using the OculusRift VR platform. Video recordings were rated by 2 pair of physician reviewers blinded to student identity. One pair provided a consensus global assessment of performance (not competent, borderline, or competent) while the other used a checklist of observable behaviors to rate performance. Binary discriminant analysis was used to identify the observable behaviors that predicted the global assessment rating. Twenty-six fourth year medical students participated. Student performance of 8 observable behaviors was found to be most predictive of a rating of competent, with a 91% probability. Correctly stating that the patient required an escalation of care had the largest contribution toward predicting a rating of competent, followed by commenting on the patient's increased heart rate, low oxygen saturation, increased respiratory rate, and stating that the patient was in respiratory distress. This study demonstrates that VR can be used to establish objective and observable performance standards for assessment of EPA attainment - a key step in moving towards competency based medical education. Copyright © 2020 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times