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Erythropoietin Administration for Anemia Due to Chronic Kidney Disease - Subcutaneous OR Intravenous, What Do We Know So Far?

Authors
  • Shahab, Muhammad Hasan1, 2
  • Saifullah Khan, Shahzeen3, 2
  • 1 Internal Medicine, Memon Medical Institute Hospital, Karachi, PAK.
  • 2 Paediatrics, Dr. Ruth K.M. Pfau Civil Hospital Karachi / Dow Medical College, Karachi, PAK.
  • 3 Accident and Emergency, Memon Medical Institute Hospital, Karachi, PAK.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Cureus
Publisher
Cureus, Inc.
Publication Date
Sep 10, 2020
Volume
12
Issue
9
Identifiers
DOI: 10.7759/cureus.10358
PMID: 33062481
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

The prevalence of anemia in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients is almost twice that of the normal population and its severity increases exponentially as the disease worsens, dramatically affecting the quality of an individual's life. The advent of erythropoiesis stimulating agents (ESA) in the 1980s saw a revolutionary change in the treatment of anemia in CKD patients, drastically improving quality of life (QoL), overall health and reducing the need for blood transfusions. Numerous ESAs have been developed ever since and are in current use, with the primary routes of administration being intravenous (IV) and subcutaneous (SC) injections. Their use, however, has stirred significant controversy over the last two decades. Additionally, despite numerous studies and trials, the latest international recommendations for their use do not provide clear cut guidance with well-grounded evidence on the recommended route of administration for different sets of patients. Instead, this decision has mainly been left up to the physician's discretion, whilst keeping certain key factors in mind. This review shall summarize, discuss and compare the findings of previous studies on various factors governing the two aforementioned routes of administration and identify areas that need further exploration. Copyright © 2020, Shahab et al.

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