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Erratum to: When host-plant resistance to a pest leads to higher plant damage

Authors
  • Nboyine, J. A.
  • Saville, D.
  • Boyer, S.
  • Cruickshank, R. H.
  • Wratten, S. D.
  • Stephane Boyer
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Pest Science
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Sep 10, 2016
Volume
90
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s10340-016-0809-9
Source
MyScienceWork
License
Green

Abstract

Erratum to: J Pest Sci DOI 10.1007/s10340-016-0789-9 Journal of Pest Science, pp. 1–10, the sentences below should be substituted for the existing words in the section ‘Analysis of plants for loline alkaloids’. Samples of each grass treatment (each >500 mg fresh weight excluding the roots) were washed and dried with paper towels. They were immediately frozen in liquid nitrogen, ground into fine powder and freeze-dried. A method modified from Blankenship et al. (2001) was then used to analyse the loline alkaloid content of each sample. Briefly, the extraction involved passing 100 mg of each sample in 5 ml of dichloromethane/ethanol (95:5) solvent containing 6 mg phenylmorpholine/100 ml of solvent as the internal standard, along with 250 µl saturated sodium bicarbonate. They were then shaken at room temperature for 1 h at 200 rpm on an orbital shaker and left to settle for 10 min before being filtered into 2-ml GC vials. A Shimadzu GC-2010 gas chromatograph equipped with a flame ionization detector was used to analyse the filtrates. Hydrogen passed through an Rtx-624 column was used as the carrier gas in these analyses. The retention times for N-methyl loline (NML), N-acetyl norline (NANL), N-formyl loline (NFL) and N-acetyl loline (NAL) were 12.8, 17.4, 18.2 and 18.8 min, respectively.

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