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Epidemiology of Oropharyngeal Candidiasis in Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome Patients and CD4+ Counts.

Authors
  • Berberi, Antoine1
  • Noujeim, Ziad2
  • Aoun, Georges3
  • 1 Professor, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Dentistry, Lebanese University, Beirut, Lebanon. , (Lebanon)
  • 2 Lecturer and Director Postgraduate Program of Oral Pathology, Departments of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Pathology and Diagnosis Science, School of Dentistry, Lebanese University, Beirut, Lebanon. , (Lebanon)
  • 3 Assistant Professor, Department of Pathology and Diagnosis Science, School of Dentistry, Lebanese University, Beirut, Lebanon. , (Lebanon)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of international oral health : JIOH
Publication Date
Mar 01, 2015
Volume
7
Issue
3
Pages
20–23
Identifiers
PMID: 25878473
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

The present study was directed to evaluate the forms of oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC) and their correlation with CD4+ cell counts in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients. This was a descriptive and analytical cross-sectional study carried out for a 2-year period, in which quantitative data collection methods were used. 50 patients with HIV infection were evaluated. Relationship between OPC and CD4+ was investigated. Five different clinical forms were noticed on examination: pseudomembranous candidiasis 20/38 (P) was the most common one (52.6%) followed by erythematous 5/38 (13.15%), angular cheilitis 5/38 (13.15%) (AC), a combination of AC and E 4/38 (10.52%) or AC, E and P 4/38 (10.52%). Candida albicans was the most frequent specie isolated in 35 cases of OPC (92%). Candida tropicalis was isolated in 2 cases (5.26%) and Candida glabrata in 1 case (2.64%). The majority of patients with OPC had cell counts 28/38 (73%) <200 cells/mm(3), followed by 9/38 (23%) at CD4+ cell counts of 201-499 cells/mm(3). Oral Candida colonization and invasive infection occur more frequently in HIV-positive patient and is significantly more common in patients with CD4+ cell counts <200 cell/mm(3).

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