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The epidemiologic associations of food availability with national incidence and mortality rates of pediatric central nervous system tumors.

Authors
  • Lu, Victor M1, 2
  • Niazi, Toba N3, 4
  • 1 Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Miami, Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, FL, USA. [email protected].
  • 2 Department of Neurological Surgery, Nicklaus Children's Hospital, Miami, FL, USA. [email protected].
  • 3 Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Miami, Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, FL, USA.
  • 4 Department of Neurological Surgery, Nicklaus Children's Hospital, Miami, FL, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Child's nervous system : ChNS : official journal of the International Society for Pediatric Neurosurgery
Publication Date
Feb 01, 2024
Volume
40
Issue
2
Pages
445–451
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s00381-023-06134-5
PMID: 37606833
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

The epidemiology of central nervous system (CNS) tumors in pediatric patients worldwide continues to be defined. To date, there has been no evaluation of how national food availability may associate with the incidence and mortality of these tumors. Correspondingly, the aim of this study was to define if such associations exist. The most updated incidence and mortality rates of CNS tumors in pediatric patients were abstracted by country from the Global Burden of Disease database. Data regarding food availability parameters were identified and abstracted from the Food Systems Dashboard database. Associations were tested using univariate and multivariate regression analyses. There were sufficient data in a total of 175 countries worldwide describing the required outcomes. Median incidence and mortality rates across these countries were 1.63 per 100,000 and 0.80 per 100,000, respectively. Higher incidence rates of pediatric CNS tumors were statistically associated with lower availability of fruit and vegetables (P = 0.02), higher average protein supply (P < 0.01), lower share of dietary energy from cereal and roots (P < 0.01), lower supply of meat (P < 0.01), lower supply of nuts and seeds (P < 0.01), lower supply of vegetable oils (P < 0.01), and higher supply of vegetables (P < 0.01). Higher mortality rates due to pediatric CNS tumors were statistically associated with lower availability of fruit and vegetables (P = 0.048), lower supply of fish (P = 0.046), and lower supply of nuts and seeds (P = 0.04). When categorizing countries based on income status, there was a decrease in significant associations found more pronounced in low-middle income countries. There are many novel associations between national food availability and the incidence and mortality rates of pediatric CNS tumors across the world, which may be more pronounced and divergent in low-middle income countries. A greater understanding is needed to identify what specific components of the significant parameters influence these trends and how public health efforts may best address these associations to improve overall outcomes. © 2023. The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature.

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