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Environmental distribution of Echinococcus- and Taenia spp.-contaminated dog feces in Kyrgyzstan.

Authors
  • Abdykerimov, Kubanychbek K1, 2
  • Kronenberg, Philipp A3, 4
  • Isaev, Myktybek2
  • Paternoster, Giulia1, 5
  • Deplazes, Peter3, 6
  • Torgerson, Paul R1
  • 1 Section of Epidemiology, Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. , (Switzerland)
  • 2 Kyrgyz Research Institute of Veterinary named after A. Duisheev, Ministry of Education and Science of the Kyrgyz Republic, Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan. , (Kyrgyzstan)
  • 3 Vetsuisse and Medical Faculty, Institute of Parasitology, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. , (Switzerland)
  • 4 Microbiology and Molecular Biology, Institute of Chemistry and Biotechnology, Zurich University of Applied Sciences (ZHAW), Wädenswil, Switzerland. , (Switzerland)
  • 5 Federal Food Safety and Veterinary Office FSVO, Bern, Switzerland. , (Switzerland)
  • 6 Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. , (Switzerland)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Parasitology
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2024
Volume
151
Issue
1
Pages
84–92
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1017/S003118202300118X
PMID: 38018240
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Recently, there have been epidemics of human cystic echinococcosis (CE) and alveolar echinococcosis (AE) in Kyrgyzstan. This study investigated 2 districts for the presence of Echinococcus granulosus s.l. and Echinococcus multilocularis eggs; species identity was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction in dog feces and the level of environmental contamination with parasite eggs in 2017–2018 was also investigated. In the Alay district 5 villages with a high reported annual incidence of AE of 162 cases per 100 000 and 5 villages in the Kochkor district which had a much lower incidence of 21 cases per 100 000 were investigated. However, the proportion of dog feces containing E. granulosus s.l. eggs was ~4.2 and ~3.5% in Alay and Kochkor respectively. For E. multilocularis, the corresponding proportions were 2.8 and 3.2%. Environmental contamination of Echinococcus spp. eggs was estimated using the McMaster technique for fecal egg counts, weight and density of canine feces. The level of environmental contamination with E. multilocularis eggs was similar at 4.4 and 5.0 eggs per m2 in Alay and Kochkor respectively. The corresponding values for E. granulosus s.l. were 8.3 and 7.5 eggs per m2. There was no association between village or district level incidence of human AE or CE and the proportion of dog feces containing eggs of Echinococcus spp. or the level of environmental contamination. Increased contamination of taeniid eggs occured in the autumn, after the return of farmers with dogs from summer mountain pastures.

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