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Enhanced photodynamic therapy and effective elimination of cancer stem cells using surfactant-polymer nanoparticles.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Molecular Pharmaceutics
1543-8392
Publisher
American Chemical Society
Publication Date
Volume
11
Issue
9
Pages
3186–3195
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1021/mp5003619
PMID: 25061685
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Photodynamic therapy is a potentially curative treatment for various types of cancer. It involves energy transfer from an excited photosensitizer to surrounding oxygen molecules to produce cytotoxic singlet oxygen species, a process termed as type II reaction. The efficiency of photodynamic therapy is greatly reduced because of the reduced levels of oxygen, often found in tumor microenvironments that also house cancer stem cells, a subpopulation of tumor cells that are characterized by enhanced tumorigenicity and resistance to conventional therapies. We show here that encapsulation of a photosensitizer, methylene blue, in alginate-Aerosol OT nanoparticles leads to an increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. ROS generation was found to depend on the interaction of the cationic photosensitizer with the anionic alginate polymer. Dye-polymer interaction was characterized by formation of methylene blue dimers, potentially enabling electron transfer and a type I photochemical reaction that is less sensitive to environmental oxygen concentration. We also find that nanoparticle encapsulated methylene blue has the capacity to eliminate cancer stem cells under hypoxic conditions, an important goal of current cancer therapy.

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