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Enhanced Oxidation of Antibiotics by Ferrate Mediated with Natural Organic Matter: Role of Phenolic Moieties.

Authors
  • Guo, Binglin1, 2
  • Wang, Junyue3
  • Sathiyan, Krishnamoorthy1
  • Ma, Xingmao2
  • Lichtfouse, Eric4
  • Huang, Ching-Hua3
  • Sharma, Virender K1
  • 1 Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, School of Public Health, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, 77843, USA.
  • 2 Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77843, USA.
  • 3 School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332, USA. , (Georgia)
  • 4 Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS, IRD, INRAE, College de France, CEREGE, Aix-en-Provence 13100, France. , (France)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Environmental Science & Technology
Publisher
American Chemical Society
Publication Date
Nov 28, 2023
Volume
57
Issue
47
Pages
19033–19042
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1021/acs.est.3c03165
PMID: 37384585
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

The increasing presence of antibiotics in water sources threatens public health and ecosystems. Various treatments have been previously applied to degrade antibiotics, yet their efficiency is commonly hindered by the presence of natural organic matter (NOM) in water. On the contrary, we show here that nine types of NOM and NOM model compounds improved the removal of trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole by ferrate(VI) (FeVIO42-, Fe(VI)) under mild alkaline conditions. This is probably associated with the presence of phenolic moieties in NOMs, as suggested by first-order kinetics using NOM, phenol, and hydroquinone. Electron paramagnetic resonance reveals that NOM radicals are generated within milliseconds in the Fe(VI)-NOM system via single-electron transfer from NOM to Fe(VI) with the formation of Fe(V). The dominance of the Fe(V) reaction with antibiotics resulted in their enhanced removal despite concurrent reactions between Fe(V) and NOM moieties, the radicals, and water. Kinetic modeling considering Fe(V) explains the enhanced kinetics of antibiotics abatement at low phenol concentrations. Experiments with humic and fulvic acids of lake and river waters show similar results, thus supporting the enhanced abatement of antibiotics in real water situations.

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