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Enhanced ice sheet growth in Eurasia owing to adjacent ice-dammed lakes.

Authors
  • Krinner, G
  • Mangerud, J
  • Jakobsson, M
  • Crucifix, M
  • Ritz, C
  • Svendsen, J I
Type
Published Article
Journal
Nature
Publisher
Springer Nature
Publication Date
Jan 29, 2004
Volume
427
Issue
6973
Pages
429–432
Identifiers
PMID: 14749827
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Large proglacial lakes cool regional summer climate because of their large heat capacity, and have been shown to modify precipitation through mesoscale atmospheric feedbacks, as in the case of Lake Agassiz. Several large ice-dammed lakes, with a combined area twice that of the Caspian Sea, were formed in northern Eurasia about 90,000 years ago, during the last glacial period when an ice sheet centred over the Barents and Kara seas blocked the large northbound Russian rivers. Here we present high-resolution simulations with an atmospheric general circulation model that explicitly simulates the surface mass balance of the ice sheet. We show that the main influence of the Eurasian proglacial lakes was a significant reduction of ice sheet melting at the southern margin of the Barents-Kara ice sheet through strong regional summer cooling over large parts of Russia. In our simulations, the summer melt reduction clearly outweighs lake-induced decreases in moisture and hence snowfall, such as has been reported earlier for Lake Agassiz. We conclude that the summer cooling mechanism from proglacial lakes accelerated ice sheet growth and delayed ice sheet decay in Eurasia and probably also in North America.

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