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Engineering Students as Co-creators in an Ethics of Technology Course

Authors
  • Bombaerts, Gunter1
  • Doulougeri, Karolina1
  • Tsui, Shelly1
  • Laes, Erik1, 2
  • Spahn, Andreas1
  • Martin, Diana Adela1, 3
  • 1 Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, The Netherlands , Eindhoven (Netherlands)
  • 2 VITO – Vision on Technology, Boeretang 200, Mol, 2400, Belgium , Mol (Belgium)
  • 3 Technological University Dublin, Dublin, Ireland , Dublin (Ireland)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Science and Engineering Ethics
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Jul 23, 2021
Volume
27
Issue
4
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s11948-021-00326-5
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
Disciplines
  • Original Research/Scholarship
License
Green

Abstract

Research on the effectiveness of case studies in teaching engineering ethics in higher education is underdeveloped. To add to our knowledge, we have systematically compared the outcomes of two case approaches to an undergraduate course on the ethics of technology: a detached approach using real-life cases and a challenge-based learning (CBL) approach with students and stakeholders acting as co-creators (CC). We first developed a practical typology of case-study approaches and subsequently tested an evaluation method to assess the students’ learning experiences (basic needs and motivation) and outcomes (competence development) and staff interpretations and operationalizations, seeking to answer three questions: (1) Do students in the CBL approach report higher basic needs, motivation and competence development compared to their peers in the detached approach? (2) What is the relationship between student-perceived co-creation and their basic needs, motivation and competence development? And (3) what are the implications of CBL/CC for engineering-ethics teaching and learning? Our mixed methods analysis favored CBL as it best supported teaching and research goals while satisfying the students’ basic needs and promoting intrinsic motivation and communication competences. Competence progress in other areas did not differ between approaches, and motivation in terms of identified regulation was lower for CBL, with staff perceiving a higher workload. We propose that our case typology model is useful and that as a method to engage students as co-creators, CBL certainly merits further development and evaluation, as does our effectiveness analysis for engineering ethics instruction in general and for case-study approaches in particular.

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