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Engagement in Online Learning: Student Attitudes and Behavior During COVID-19

Authors
  • Hollister, Brooke1
  • Nair, Praveen2
  • Hill-Lindsay, Sloan3, 4
  • Chukoskie, Leanne5, 6, 7
  • 1 Department of Mathematics, University of California, San Diego, San Diego, CA , (United States)
  • 2 Halıcıoǧlu Data Science Institute, University of California, San Diego, San Diego, CA , (United States)
  • 3 Joint Doctoral Program in Math and Science Education, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA , (United States)
  • 4 Joint Doctoral Program in Math and Science Education, University of California, San Diego, San Diego, CA , (United States)
  • 5 Department of Physical Therapy, Movement and Rehabilitation Science, Bouvé College of Health, Northeastern University, Boston, MA , (United States)
  • 6 Art and Design, College of Arts, Media and Design, Northeastern University, Boston, MA , (United States)
  • 7 Qualcomm Institute, University of California, San Diego, San Diego, CA , (United States)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Frontiers in Education
Publisher
Frontiers Media S.A.
Publication Date
May 09, 2022
Volume
7
Identifiers
DOI: 10.3389/feduc.2022.851019
Source
Frontiers
Keywords
Disciplines
  • Education
  • Original Research
License
Green

Abstract

The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in nearly all universities switching courses to online formats. We surveyed the online learning experience of undergraduate students (n = 187) at a large, public research institution in course structure, interpersonal interaction, and academic resources. Data was also collected from course evaluations. Students reported decreases in live lecture engagement and attendance, with 72 percent reporting that low engagement during lectures hurt their online learning experience. A majority of students reported that they struggled with staying connected to their peers and instructors and managing the pace of coursework. Students had positive impressions, however, of their instructional staff. Majorities of students felt more comfortable asking and answering questions in online classes, suggesting that there might be features of learning online to which students are receptive, and which may also benefit in-person classes.

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