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Energy-converting hydrogenases: the link between H2 metabolism and energy conservation.

Authors
  • Schoelmerich, Marie Charlotte1, 2
  • Müller, Volker3
  • 1 Molecular Microbiology and Bioenergetics, Institute of Molecular Biosciences, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University Frankfurt/Main, Max-von-Laue-Str. 9, 60438, Frankfurt, Germany. , (Germany)
  • 2 Microbiology and Biotechnology, Institute of Plant Sciences and Microbiology, Universität Hamburg, Ohnhorststr. 18, 22609, Hamburg, Germany. , (Germany)
  • 3 Molecular Microbiology and Bioenergetics, Institute of Molecular Biosciences, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University Frankfurt/Main, Max-von-Laue-Str. 9, 60438, Frankfurt, Germany. [email protected] , (Germany)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Oct 19, 2019
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s00018-019-03329-5
PMID: 31630229
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

The reversible interconversion of molecular hydrogen and protons is one of the most ancient microbial metabolic reactions and catalyzed by hydrogenases. A widespread yet largely enigmatic group comprises multisubunit [NiFe] hydrogenases, that directly couple H2 metabolism to the electrochemical ion gradient across the membranes of bacteria and of archaea. These complexes are collectively referred to as energy-converting hydrogenases (Ech), as they reversibly transform redox energy into physicochemical energy. Redox energy is typically provided by a low potential electron donor such as reduced ferredoxin to fuel H2 evolution and the establishment of a transmembrane electrochemical ion gradient ([Formula: see text]). The [Formula: see text] is then utilized by an ATP synthase for energy conservation by generating ATP. This review describes the modular structure/function of Ech complexes, focuses on insights into the energy-converting mechanisms, describes the evolutionary context and delves into the implications of relying on an Ech complex as respiratory enzyme for microbial metabolism.

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