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Endothelium-dependent relaxations in canine coronary arteries are enhanced in early heart failure and persist in recovery.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Canadian journal of physiology and pharmacology
Publication Date
Volume
72
Issue
10
Pages
1148–1154
Identifiers
PMID: 7882178
Source
Medline

Abstract

In vitro coronary artery responsiveness to noradrenaline, phenylephrine, and BHT-920 together with functional relaxation to acetylcholine was assessed in dogs at the early onset of pacing-induced heart failure (1 week) and in dogs recovered from heart failure (3 weeks paced, followed by 4 weeks discontinued pacing). alpha-Adrenoceptor stimulation produced contractile responses that were unaltered in early congestive heart failure and recovery. Contractions to noradrenaline and BHT-920 were always less than those produced by phenylephrine. Endothelium-intact arteries demonstrated relaxations in response to noradrenaline and BHT-920, but not phenylephrine. Relaxations to noradrenaline were enhanced 24% in early heart failure and 47% following recovery from heart failure, compared with control. BHT-920 produced relaxations that were augmented 21 and 76% in early heart failure and recovery, respectively. Contractile sensitivity to noradrenaline increased 5-fold in early heart failure and was not different in recovery, compared with control. Contractile sensitivity to BHT-920 and phenylephrine was unaltered throughout. Acetylcholine produced relaxations that were increased 21% in early heart failure and 13% after recovery from congestive heart failure. Furthermore, acetylcholine sensitivity was significantly enhanced in early heart failure and recovery. The current study reveals a progressive adaptation of the coronary endothelium in congestive heart failure, possibly directed towards protection against excessive vasoconstriction due to circulating catecholamines.

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