Affordable Access

[Endoscopic polypectomy--sense and nonsense].

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Zeitschrift für Gastroenterologie
Publication Date
Volume
32
Issue
7
Pages
412–415
Identifiers
PMID: 7975779
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

The vast majority of gastrointestinal polyps are hyperplastic polyps or adenomas, their identification is possible bioptically. Adenomas are precancerous lesions, smaller ones with a diameter minor than 1 cm show invasive carcinoma in nearly 1%, in major polyps the percentage of invasive carcinoma will be 10% and more. Adenomas should therefore be removed with electrocautery snare (endoscopic polypectomy). Hamartomatous polyps (Peutz-Jeghers and juvenile polyps) are much less frequent, and mainly met with the Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) and familial juvenile polyposis (FJP). Hamartomas may bleed or induce obstruction or invagination. Adenomatous and malignant structures may be found within hamartomas, endoscopic polypectomy of these polyps is therefore mandatory. Mesenchymal (submucosal) polyps--leiomyoma, neurinoma--may only be identified by button-hole biopsy or after polypectomy; smaller submucosal polyps (up to 2 cm diameter) can be removed endoscopically, if strangulation is possible; the others should be removed during operation. Carcinoid tumors are rare within the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract, those with a diameter up to 1 cm should be removed by endoscopic polypectomy, larger ones have to be operated on.

Statistics

Seen <100 times