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Is endometriosis an endometrial disease?

Authors
  • Vinatier, D
  • Cosson, M
  • Dufour, P
Type
Published Article
Journal
European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Aug 01, 2000
Volume
91
Issue
2
Pages
113–125
Identifiers
PMID: 10869783
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Endometriosis is characterised by the presence of abnormally located tissue resembling the endometrium with glands and stroma. Several hypotheses have attempted to explain the development of such tissue. The most often cited theory, that of implantation, proposes that the physiological phenomenon of endometrial reflux in the fallopian tubes during menstruation may, in certain conditions, overcome local defense mechanisms, implant, and proliferate. The implantation theory does not explain why endometriosis will develop only in approximately 10-15% of women, while the reflux of endometrial tissue via the fallopian tubes during menstruation is a quasi-universal phenomenon. The endometrium of women affected by endometriosis could be abnormal compared with endometrium of healthy women. The abnormal endometrium could be able to protect itself from harmful effects of immune cells by expressing specific antigens, by harbouring a different immune cell population and by synthetizing and secreting immunosuppressive factors. Several others characteristic features of endometrium have been described in women with endometriosis: (1) production of its own estrogens in too heavy amount; (2) aptitude for setting up on peritoneum; (3) tendencies to proliferate and to invade tissue; (4) aggressiveness for the peritoneum; (5) auto-protection from physiological apoptosis; (6) abnormal expression of heat shock proteins; and (7) excessive angiogenesis.

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