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Endogenous natriuretic factors 1: sodium pump inhibition does not correlate with natriuretic or pressor activities from uremic urine.

Authors
  • Benaksas, E J
  • Murray, E D Jr
  • Rodgers, C L
  • Pham, T
  • Bigornia, A E
  • DeWind, S A
  • Giebel, R
  • Brubacher, E S
  • Wechter, W J
Type
Published Article
Journal
Life Sciences
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Jan 01, 1993
Volume
52
Issue
12
Pages
1045–1054
Identifiers
PMID: 8383267
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

It is our purpose to isolate and characterize the putative "Natriuretic Hormone", ostensibly responsible for ECF homeostasis, as well as identify endogenous pressors and compounds that induce prolonged natriuresis; we report here our initial progress in this area. Large volumes of pooled urine collected from uremic patients were fractionated, and the resulting isolates were evaluated for in vivo natriuretic and pressor effects and Na+/K(+)-ATPase inhibitory activity in renal cells. The purification steps involved ultrafiltration to obtain materials of less than 3000 da, gel filtration, and sequential reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). After each HPLC step, the fractions were evaluated for their ability to elicit significant natriuresis and/or influence mean arterial pressure in the normal conscious female rat. Each fraction was also assayed for its ability to inhibit Na+/K(+)-ATPase as determined by the inhibition of 86Rb+ uptake into MDBK renal cells. While several of the fractions elicited profound natriuresis and/or pressor activity and other fractions inhibited Na+/K(+)-ATPase, there was no correlation among the activities in individual fractions. We have concluded that this plethora of bioactivities is responsible for much of the confusion and multiplicity of crude isolates claimed to be the putative hormone. Presently we are attempting to purify each of these activities to chemical homogeneity for structure determination.

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