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End-of-line hyphenation of chemical names (IUPAC Recommendations 2020)

Authors
  • Dijkstra, Albert J.1
  • Hellwich, Karl-Heinz2
  • Hartshorn, Richard M.3
  • Reedijk, Jan4
  • Szabo, Erik5
  • 1 Ajuinlei 13c, 9000 , (Belgium)
  • 2 Beilstein-Institut zur Förderung der Chemischen Wissenschaften, Trakehner Str. 7–9, 60487 , (Germany)
  • 3 School of Physical and Chemical Sciences, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800 , (New Zealand)
  • 4 Leiden Institute of Chemistry, PO Box 9502, 2300 RA , (Netherlands)
  • 5 Department of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Slovakia , (Slovakia)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Pure and Applied Chemistry
Publisher
Walter de Gruyter GmbH
Publication Date
Nov 19, 2020
Volume
93
Issue
1
Pages
47–68
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1515/pac-2019-1005
Source
De Gruyter
Keywords
License
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Abstract

Chemical names can be so long that, when a manuscript is printed, they have to be hyphenated/divided at the end of a line. Many names already contain hyphens, but in some cases, using these hyphens as end-of-line divisions can lead to illogical divisions in print, as can also happen when hyphens are added arbitrarily without considering the ‘chemical’ context. The present document provides guidelines for authors of chemical manuscripts, their publishers and editors, on where to divide chemical names at the end of a line, and instructions on how to avoid these names being divided at illogical places. Readability and chemical sense should prevail when authors insert hyphens. The software used to convert electronic manuscripts to print can now be programmed to avoid illogical end-of-line hyphenation and thereby save the author much time and annoyance when proofreading. The Recommendations also allow readers of the printed article to determine which end-of-line hyphens are an integral part of the name and should not be deleted when ‘undividing’ the name. These Recommendations may also prove useful in languages other than English.

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