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Endocannabinoid system in psychotic and mood disorders: A review of human studies.

Authors
  • Garani, Ranjini1
  • Watts, Jeremy J1
  • Mizrahi, Romina2
  • 1 Research Imaging Centre, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, 250 College St., Toronto, Ontario M5T 1R8, Canada; Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, 1 King's College Circle, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A8, Canada. , (Canada)
  • 2 Research Imaging Centre, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, 250 College St., Toronto, Ontario M5T 1R8, Canada; Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, 1 King's College Circle, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A8, Canada; Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, 250 College St., Toronto, Ontario M5T 1R8, Canada; Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Campbell Family Mental Health Research Institute, 250 College St, Toronto, Ontario M5T 1R8, Canada. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Canada)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Progress in neuro-psychopharmacology & biological psychiatry
Publication Date
Sep 05, 2020
Pages
110096–110096
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.pnpbp.2020.110096
PMID: 32898588
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Despite widespread evidence of endocannabinoid system involvement in the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders, our understanding remains rudimentary. Here we review studies of the endocannabinoid system in humans with psychotic and mood disorders. Postmortem, peripheral, cerebrospinal fluid and in vivo imaging studies provide evidence for the role of the endocannabinoid system in both psychotic and mood disorders. Psychotic disorders and major depressive disorder exhibit alterations of brain cannabinoid CB1 receptors and peripheral blood endocannabinoids. Further, these changes may be sensitive to treatment status, disease state, and symptom severity. Evidence from psychotic disorder extend to endocannabinoid metabolizing enzymes in the brain and periphery, whereas these lines of evidence remain poorly developed in mood disorders. A lack of studies examining this system in bipolar disorder represents a notable gap in the literature. Despite a growing body of productive work in this field of research, there is a clear need for investigation beyond the CB1 receptor in order to more fully elucidate the role of the endocannabinoid system in psychotic and mood disorders. Copyright © 2020. Published by Elsevier Inc.

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