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Emotional and psychosocial factors in burn patients during hospitalization.

Authors
  • Franulic, A
  • González, X
  • Trucco, M
  • Vallejos, F
Type
Published Article
Journal
Burns
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Dec 01, 1996
Volume
22
Issue
8
Pages
618–622
Identifiers
PMID: 8982540
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

This is a preliminary study of psychological symptoms, prior psychosocial adjustment and severity of injury in 25 consecutive burn patients. All had suffered burns in work-related accidents and were evaluated by the psychiatric consulation-liaison team during their initial hospitalization in the Burn Unit of the Hospital del Trabajador, Santiago. All patients were clinically evaluated and the following instruments were applied: Hamilton Scales of Anxiety (HAM-A) and Depression (HAM-D), Goldberg's General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28), Cloninger's Tridimensional Personality Questionnaire (TPQ) and a modified version of a Schooler's Adjustment Scale. No significant correlation was found between extent and severity of burns and anxious or depressive symptoms. However, all patients had burns that varied from mild to moderate; there were no severe and extensive injuries. A significant correlation was found between anxiety and the harm avoidance dimension in the TPQ, as would be expected. Patients with poor psychosocial adjustment presented with greater anxiety symptoms. A significant negative correlation was also found between degree of anxiety symptoms and income level. The main findings are in agreement with current literature. They emphasize the relevance of prior psychosocial adjustment and personality as probable factors of psychological symptoms. The need to control pain as a variable is also pointed out.

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