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Elucidating Multiple Electron-Transfer Pathways for Metavanadate Bioreduction by Actinomycetic Streptomyces microflavus.

Authors
  • Wang, Shixiang1
  • Zhang, Baogang1
  • Fei, Yangmei1
  • Liu, Huan1
  • Zhao, Yi1
  • Guo, Huaming1
  • 1 MOE Key Laboratory of Groundwater Circulation and Environmental Evolution, School of Water Resources and Environment, China University of Geosciences Beijing, Beijing 100083, P. R. China. , (China)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Environmental Science & Technology
Publisher
American Chemical Society
Publication Date
Dec 05, 2023
Volume
57
Issue
48
Pages
19921–19931
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1021/acs.est.3c07288
PMID: 37934564
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

While microbial reduction has gained widespread recognition for efficiently remediating environments polluted by toxic metavanadate [V(V)], the pool of identified V(V)-reducing strains remains rather limited, with the vast majority belonging to bacteria and fungi. This study is among the first to confirm the V(V) reduction capability of Streptomyces microflavus, a representative member of ubiquitous actinomycetes in environment. A V(V) removal efficiency of 91.0 ± 4.35% was achieved during 12 days of operation, with a maximum specific growth rate of 0.073 d-1. V(V) was bioreduced to insoluble V(IV) precipitates. V(V) reduction took place both intracellularly and extracellularly. Electron transfer was enhanced during V(V) bioreduction with increased electron transporters. The electron-transfer pathways were revealed through transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic analyses. Electrons might flow either through the respiratory chain to reduce intracellular V(V) or to cytochrome c on the outer membrane for extracellular V(V) reduction. Soluble riboflavin and quinone also possibly mediated extracellular V(V) reduction. Glutathione might deliver electrons for intracellular V(V) reduction. Bioaugmentation of the aquifer sediment with S. microflavus accelerated V(V) reduction. The strain could successfully colonize the sediment and foster positive correlations with indigenous microorganisms. This study offers new microbial resources for V(V) bioremediation and improve the understanding of the involved molecular mechanisms.

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