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Electronic Cigarette Advertising Impacts Adversely on Smoking Behaviour Within a London Student Cohort: A Cross-Sectional Structured Survey.

Authors
  • Ratneswaran, C1, 2, 3
  • Steier, J4, 5
  • Reed, K5
  • Khong, T K6
  • 1 Lane Fox Unit/ Sleep Disorders Centre, NHS Foundation Trust, Guy's and St ThomasWestminster Bridge Road, London, SE1 7EH, UK. [email protected]
  • 2 Faculty of Life Sciences and Medicine, Centre for Human & Applied Physiological Sciences, King's College London, London, UK. [email protected]
  • 3 Institute of Medical and Biomedical Education, St George's, University of London, London, UK. [email protected]
  • 4 Lane Fox Unit/ Sleep Disorders Centre, NHS Foundation Trust, Guy's and St ThomasWestminster Bridge Road, London, SE1 7EH, UK.
  • 5 Faculty of Life Sciences and Medicine, Centre for Human & Applied Physiological Sciences, King's College London, London, UK.
  • 6 Institute of Medical and Biomedical Education, St George's, University of London, London, UK.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Lung
Publication Date
Oct 01, 2019
Volume
197
Issue
5
Pages
533–540
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s00408-019-00262-z
PMID: 31463548
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

In contrast to tobacco smoking, electronic cigarette ("vaping") advertisement had been approved in the United Kingdom (UK) in January 2013. Currently, there are an estimated 3.2 million UK e-cigarette users. The impact of e-cigarette advertisement on tobacco use has not been studied in detail. We hypothesised that e-cigarette advertisement impacts on conventional smoking behaviour. A cross-sectional structured survey assessed the impact of e-cigarette advertising on the perceived social acceptability of cigarette and e-cigarette smoking and on using either cigarettes or e-cigarettes (on a scale of 1 to 5/'not at all' to 'a lot'). The survey was administered between January to March 2015 to London university students, before and after viewing 5 UK adverts including a TV commercial. Data were collected from 106 participants (22 ± 2 years, 66% male), comprising cigarette smokers (32%), non-smokers (54%) and ex-smokers (14%). This included vapers (16%), non-vapers (77%) and ex-vapers (7%). After viewing the adverts, smokers (2.6 ± 1.0 vs. 3.8 ± 1.1, p = 0.001) and non-smokers (3.2 ± 0.7 vs. 3.7 ± 0.8, p = 0.007) felt smoking was more socially acceptable, compared to before viewing them. Participants were more likely to try both e-cigarettes (1.90 ± 1.03 to 3.09 ± 1.11, p < 0.001) and conventional cigarettes (1.73 ± 0.83 to 2.27 ± 1.13, p < 0.001) after viewing the adverts compared to before. Vapers were less likely to smoke both an e-cigarette, and a conventional cigarette after viewing the adverts. E-cigarette advertising encourages both e-cigarette and conventional cigarette use in young smokers and non-smokers. The adverts increase the social acceptability of smoking without regarding the importance of public health campaigns that champion smoking cessation.

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