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Electroencephalographic and cardiovascular markers of vulnerability within families of suicidal adolescents: A pilot study.

Authors
  • Kaufman, Erin A1
  • Crowell, Sheila E2
  • Coleman, James3
  • Puzia, Megan E3
  • Gray, Douglas D4
  • Strayer, David L3
  • 1 Department of Psychology, University of Utah, United States. Electronic address: [email protected] , (United States)
  • 2 Department of Psychology, University of Utah, United States; Department of Psychiatry, University of Utah, United States. , (United States)
  • 3 Department of Psychology, University of Utah, United States. , (United States)
  • 4 Department of Psychiatry, University of Utah, United States; University Neuropsychiatric Institute, University of Utah, United States; Department of Pediatrics, University of Utah, United States. , (United States)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Biological psychology
Publication Date
May 18, 2018
Volume
136
Pages
46–56
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.biopsycho.2018.05.007
PMID: 29782969
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

Suicide, self-injury, and predisposing vulnerabilities aggregate in families. Those at greatest risk often show deficits in two biologically-mediated domains: behavioral control and emotion regulation. This pilot study explored electroencephalographic and cardiovascular indices of self-regulation among typical and suicidal adolescents (n = 30/group) and biological family members (mothers, fathers, and siblings). We measured event-related potentials during a flanker task designed to evoke impulsive responding and respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) at rest and during social rejection. Multilevel models indicate control families' RSA was unaffected by social rejection (slope = 0.136, p = .097, d = 0.09), whereas clinical families demonstrated RSA withdrawal (slope = -0.191, p = .036, d = -0.13). Clinical families displayed weaker positive voltage (Pe) deflections following behavioral errors relative to controls (coefficient = -2.723, p = .017, d = -0.45), indicating risk for compromised cognitive control. Thus, families with suicidal adolescents showed autonomic and central nervous system differences in biological markers associated with suicide risk.

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