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Efficacy of radiofrequency ablation for recurrent thyroid cancer invading the airways.

Authors
  • Chung, Sae Rom1
  • Baek, Jung Hwan2
  • Choi, Young Jun1
  • Sung, Tae-Yon3
  • Song, Dong Eun4
  • Kim, Tae Yong5
  • Lee, Jeong Hyun1
  • 1 Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, 86 Asanbyeongwon-Gil, Songpa-gu, Seoul, 05505, South Korea. , (North Korea)
  • 2 Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, 86 Asanbyeongwon-Gil, Songpa-gu, Seoul, 05505, South Korea. [email protected] , (North Korea)
  • 3 Department of Surgery, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul, South Korea. , (North Korea)
  • 4 Department of Pathology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul, South Korea. , (North Korea)
  • 5 Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul, South Korea. , (North Korea)
Type
Published Article
Journal
European Radiology
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Apr 01, 2021
Volume
31
Issue
4
Pages
2153–2160
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s00330-020-07283-w
PMID: 32945966
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

To evaluate the efficacy of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in patients with recurrent thyroid cancer invading the airways. We reviewed patients who had undergone RFA for recurrent thyroid cancer in the central compartment after total thyroidectomy between January 2008 and December 2018. All tumors were classified according to their association with the laryngeal structure and trachea. The volume reduction rate (VRR) and complete disappearance rate were calculated, and their differences were determined relative to the association between the tumor and trachea. Complication rates associated with RFA were evaluated. The study population included 119 patients with 172 recurrent tumors. Mean VRR was 81.2% ± 55.7%, with 124 tumors (72.1%) completely disappearing after a mean follow-up of 47.9 ± 35.4 months. The complete disappearance rate of recurrent tumors not in contact with the trachea was highest, followed by tumors forming acute angles, right angles, and obtuse angles with the trachea, and tumors with intraluminal tracheal invasion (p value < 0.001). The overall complication rate was 21.4%. RFA is effective and safe for the local control of recurrent tumors in the central neck compartment after total thyroidectomy, even for tumors invading the airways, and may be considered an alternative to surgical resection. The inverse relationship between RFA efficacy and airway invasion suggests that early RFA may benefit patients with recurrent tumors in the central neck compartment. • RFA achieved a mean VRR of 81.2% ± 55.7% and complete disappearance of 124 tumors (72.1%) after a mean follow-up of 47.9 ± 35.4 months. • The complete disappearance rate of recurrent tumors not in contact with the trachea was the highest, followed by tumors forming acute angles, right angles, and obtuse angles with the trachea, and tumors with intraluminal tracheal invasion. • Stent-assisted RFA may be a good alternative for palliative treatment of recurrent tumors with intraluminal tracheal invasion.

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