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Efficacy of corticosteroid injection in rock climber's tenosynovitis.

Authors
  • Schöffl, V1
  • Strohm, P2
  • Lutter, C3
  • 1 Section Sportsorthopedics and Sportsmedicine, Department of Orthopedic and Trauma Surgery, Klinikum Bamberg, Bugerstraße 80, 96049 Bamberg, Germany; Department of Trauma Surgery, Friedrich Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Krankenhausstraße 12, 91054 Erlangen, Germany; Section of Wilderness Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Anschutz Medical Campus, 13001 East 17th Place, Aurora, CO 80045, USA; School of Clinical and Applied Sciences, Leeds Becket University, Leeds Beckett University City Campus, Leeds LS1 3HE, UK. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Germany)
  • 2 Department of Orthopedic and Trauma Surgery, Klinikum Bamberg, Bugerstraße 80, 96049 Bamberg, Germany. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Germany)
  • 3 Section Sportsorthopedics and Sportsmedicine, Department of Orthopedic and Trauma Surgery, Klinikum Bamberg, Bugerstraße 80, 96049 Bamberg, Germany; Department of Orthopedics, Rostock University Medical Center, Doberanerstraße 142, 18057 Rostock, Germany. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Germany)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Hand surgery & rehabilitation
Publication Date
Oct 01, 2019
Volume
38
Issue
5
Pages
317–322
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.hansur.2019.07.004
PMID: 31386924
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

While many finger conditions in climbers have been studied extensively, no data exist on the treatment of rock climber's finger flexor tenosynovitis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcomes after corticosteroid injection. The study included rock climbing athletes suffering from chronic (longer than 6 weeks) finger flexor tenosynovitis who were seen at our clinic in 2017. All 42 patients received two corticosteroid injections within a 7-10 day period. Thirty-one climbers (73.8%) were pain free after the second injection and a mean of 20.9±23.1 days. The climbers reported an 84.2% decrease in pain level and no complications. The positive outcome after corticosteroid injection therapy and the absence of complications justifies this invasive approach in rock climbing athletes. Copyright © 2019 SFCM. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

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