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Effects of unilateral cortical resection of the visual cortex on bilateral human white matter.

Authors
  • Maallo, Anne Margarette S1
  • Freud, Erez2
  • Liu, Tina Tong3
  • Patterson, Christina4
  • Behrmann, Marlene5
  • 1 Department of Psychology, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; Carnegie Mellon Neuroscience Institute, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. Electronic address: [email protected]
  • 2 Department of Psychology, York University, Toronto, ON, Canada; Center for Vision Research, ON, Canada. , (Canada)
  • 3 Department of Psychology, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; Laboratory of Brain and Cognition, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA.
  • 4 Department of Pediatrics, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.
  • 5 Department of Psychology, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; Carnegie Mellon Neuroscience Institute, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
NeuroImage
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Feb 15, 2020
Volume
207
Pages
116345–116345
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2019.116345
PMID: 31712165
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Children with unilateral resections of ventral occipito-temporal cortex (VOTC) typically do not evince visual perceptual impairments, even when relatively large swathes of VOTC are resected. In search of possible explanations for this behavioral competence, we evaluated white matter microstructure and connectivity in eight pediatric epilepsy patients following unilateral cortical resection and 15 age-matched controls. To uncover both local and broader resection-induced effects, we analyzed tractography data using two complementary approaches. First, the microstructural properties were measured in the inferior longitudinal and the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculi, the major VOTC association tracts. Group differences were only evident in the ipsilesional, and not in the contralesional, hemisphere, and single-subject analyses revealed that these differences were limited to the site of the resection. Second, graph theory was used to characterize the connectivity of the contralesional occipito-temporal regions. There were no changes to the network properties in patients with left VOTC resections nor in patients with resections outside the VOTC, but altered network efficiency was observed in two cases with right VOTC resections. These results suggest that, in many, although perhaps not all, cases of unilateral VOTC resections in childhood, the white matter profile in the preserved contralesional hemisphere along with residual neural activity might be sufficient for normal visual perception. Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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