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Effects of the Timing of Flashes of Light during the Course of Cellular Rotation on Phototactic Orientation of Individual Cells of Cryptomonas.

Authors
  • Kaneda, H
  • Furuya, M
Type
Published Article
Journal
PLANT PHYSIOLOGY
Publisher
American Society of Plant Biologists
Publication Date
May 01, 1987
Volume
84
Issue
1
Pages
178–181
Identifiers
PMID: 16665394
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

The swimming movement of Cryptomonas sp. cells generates a helical path, as a result of rotations with an average period of 500 milliseconds. When a flash of light at 570 nanometers for 20 microseconds was applied unidirectionally at intervals of 500 milliseconds, only a fixed side of each rotating cell was repeatedly exposed to the flashes of light. The relationship between the irradiated side of a cell and the phototactic orientation of the cell, rotating with a period of 475 to 525 milliseconds, was determined by infrared videomicrography. Only when the ventral sides of the cells were exposed to the flashes of light did their courses shift predominantly toward the light source. This result suggests that light is efficiently detected by the ventral side of these organisms.

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