Affordable Access

Effects of thiamine deficiency on brain metabolism: implications for the pathogenesis of the Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Alcohol and alcoholism (Oxford, Oxfordshire)
Publication Date
Volume
24
Issue
4
Pages
271–279
Identifiers
PMID: 2675860
Source
Medline

Abstract

Chronic alcoholism results in thiamine deficiency as a consequence of inadequate dietary intake and of impaired absorption of the vitamin. In addition, there is evidence to suggest that alcohol reduces thiamine phosphorylation to thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP) in brain. TPP is a cofactor for the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC), alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (alpha KGDH) and transketolase (TK), three enzymes involved in cerebral glucose and energy metabolism. Pyrithiamine-induced thiamine deficiency in the rat results in early, selective, reversible reductions of alpha KGDH in brain; PDHC activities are unaffected. Reductions of alpha KGDH are accompanied by decreased aspartate, glutamate and GABA and by concomitantly increased alanine in the brain of thiamine-deficient animals. It is suggested that decreased alpha KGDH, rather than decreased PDHC constitutes 'the biochemical lesion' in thiamine deficiency encephalopathy first enunciated by Peters in the 1930s. If sufficiently prolonged and severe, thiamine deficiency results in brain cell death. Possible mechanisms involved include compromised cerebral energy metabolism and focal accumulation of lactate, both of which could result from decreased activities of alpha KGDH. In addition, it is proposed that brain cell death in severe thiamine deficiency may result from excessive release of excitotoxic amino acids. Comparable mechanisms could be involved in the cell death and in the pathogenesis of the thiamine-unresponsive symptoms of the Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome in humans.

There are no comments yet on this publication. Be the first to share your thoughts.

Statistics

Seen <100 times
0 Comments