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Effects of surface water on gas sorption capacities of gravimetric sensing layers analyzed by molecular descriptors of organic adsorbates.

Authors
  • Sugimoto, Iwao
  • Mitsui, Kouta
  • Nakamura, Masayuki
  • Seyama, Michiko
Type
Published Article
Journal
Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Feb 01, 2011
Volume
399
Issue
5
Pages
1891–1899
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s00216-010-4556-0
PMID: 21165608
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

The gas sorption capacities of sputtered carbonaceous films are evaluated with quartz crystal resonators. These films are sensitive to 20 ppm organic vapors and exhibit structure-dependent responses. Films derived from synthetic polymers are hydrophobic, whereas films derived from biomaterials are amphiphilic or hydrophilic. Polyethylene (PE) film has an extremely high sorption capacity for a wide range of vapors. Transient sorption responses are investigated using a humidified carrier by employing carboxylic acid esters, whose aliphatic groups are systematically changed. Small esters with a higher affinity to water induce negative U-shaped responses from amphiphilic films derived from biomaterials. On the other hand, polymeric films exhibit positive exponential response curves. Even if the concentrations are decreased, the response intensities are enhanced with the incremental expansion of carbon chains of aliphatic groups. Only fluoropolymer film shows the opposite tendency. The modeling of quantitative structure property relationships has indicated that the sorption capacities of the PE film to the carboxylic acid esters are fundamentally governed by electrostatic interactions. The intermolecular attractive forces are basically attributable to interactions between the positively polarized sites in esters and the negatively polarized/charged sites in PE film.

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