Affordable Access

Publisher Website

Effects of standardized language on remote ultrasound-guided percutaneous nephrolithotomy training: A mixed-methods explorative pilot study.

Authors
  • Denisov, David1
  • Castro-Olmo, Coral2
  • Charondo, Leslie Bernal1
  • Yang, Heiko3
  • Van Schaik, Sandrijn4
  • Bayne, David3
  • 1 School of Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.
  • 2 School of Medicine, Universidad Central del Caribe, Bayamón, PR, Puerto Rico. , (Puerto Rico)
  • 3 Department of Urology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.
  • 4 Department of Pediatrics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Heliyon
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Sep 01, 2023
Volume
9
Issue
9
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.heliyon.2023.e19629
PMID: 37809923
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Remote teaching of procedural skills has demonstrated equivalence in knowledge acquisition compared to in-person teaching. Variations in terminology for probe and needle movements may serve as a barrier in remote training of ultrasound (US)-guided renal access for percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL). This pilot study investigated the utility of standardized terminology in remote training of US-guided renal access for PCNL. Standardization of verbal terminology to describe US probe and needle movement instruction improves remote teaching of US-guided renal access. Fifteen urology residents (PGY1-6) were stratified by year and randomized into two groups. We provided participants with images illustrating US probe and needle movements labeled with predetermined standardized terminology for the intervention group and images without labels for the control group. Both groups were asked to perform US-guided renal access on a training mannequin with a remote faculty educator with (intervention) or without (control) use of standardized movement instructions. Quantitative outcomes included number of attempts and time to achieve access. All trainees completed pre- and post-session surveys and participated in focus groups; authors conducted thematic analysis of focus group transcripts. Differences in primary outcomes between groups, including number of attempts and time to achieve access of the renal pole, were not statistically significant. Analysis of focus group interviews revealed that the use of standardized terminology in the setting of remote training can reduce trainee confusion by clarifying ambiguity in educator feedback. Use of standardized terminology during remote surgical skills training allows for more effective feedback to trainees. © 2023 The Authors.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times