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Effects of Self-Esteem on Self-Viewing: An Eye-Tracking Investigation on Mirror Gazing

Authors
  • anne schienle, jonas potthoff;
Publication Date
Nov 29, 2021
Identifiers
DOI: 10.3390/bs11120164
OAI: oai:mdpi.com:/2076-328X/11/12/164/
Source
MDPI
Keywords
Language
English
License
Green
External links

Abstract

While some people enjoy looking at their faces in the mirror, others experience emotional distress. Despite these individual differences concerning self-viewing in the mirror, systematic investigations on this topic have not been conducted so far. The present eye-tracking study examined whether personality traits (self-esteem, narcissism propensity, self-disgust) are associated with gaze behavior (gaze duration, fixation count) during free mirror viewing of one’s face. Sixty-eight adults (mean age = 23.5 years; 39 females, 29 males) viewed their faces in the mirror and watched a video of an unknown person matched for gender and age (control condition) for 90 s each. The computed regression analysis showed that higher self-esteem was associated with a shorter gaze duration for both self-face and other-face. This effect may reflect a less critical evaluation of the faces.

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